Fruit Candles

You can delight and fool your friends and family with these realistic fruit candles, made from easy-to-use moulds. They look good enough to eat (don't be surprised if someone takes a bite!) and you probably won't want to burn them! You can fill a bowl with a variety of fruit candles for a mouth-watering table centerpiece all year round! You can also use them in seasonal flower arrangements or give them as gifts to lucky friends…
Here, you'll learn how to make a tantalizing pear, but you can make any fruit you like according to the mould you have.

YOU WILL NEED:

240g/8 1/2oz paraffin wax

Double boiler

3g/1/8 disc pear fruit dye

Wicking needle

15cm/6in wick, 3.75cm/1 1/2in thick

Thermometer

Rubber fruit mould

Cardboard template to support neck of mould

Water bath, slightly larger than the mould

Dish washing liquid

Craft knife

Burnt sienna poster paint

Paintbrush

Dipping can

Cloth

White spirit

Green or yellow wax to dip the finished candle

 

HOW TO MAKE YOUR CREATION:

It's a great idea to have everything you need ready and to work on an uncluttered surface to avoid messes and accidents!

The technique involves a flexible, rubber fruit mould which is filled with wax and then left to cool in a water bath. The water bath must fit the candle snugly because too much water around the candle may cause it to distort while cooling.

Place the wax in the top of a double boiler. Melt it and add the pear fruit dye. Stir the mixture well, until the wax is completely blended with the dye. 

Wicking needles, available from candle making supply or craft stores, are used for inserting wicks and for securing them at the base of the mould. Do not dip the wick before placing it in the mould since this increases the possibility of wax leaking. When inserting the wick with the wicking needle, try and make the hole as small as possible. Using the needle, thread the unprimed wick up through the mould. Rest the needle across the base of the mould. Gently pull the wick until it is taut and tie it to the needle.

Fit the cardboard template around the neck of the rubber mould and then stand the mould in the bath of water.

Heat the wax to 93ºC/199ºF using the wax thermometer and pour it carefully into the rubber mould. Leave it for one minute. A clinical thermometer is no good since it doesn't reach the required temperatures. In place of a wax thermometer, a cooking thermometer is just as effective.

Carefully lift the mould up by the cardboard template and tap it with your fingers to release any air bubbles trapped inside. Add cold water to the water bath and lower the mould back into it.

Prick the neck of the mould with the wicking needle as soon as the surface of the wax starts to harden. After 10 minutes, change the water in the bath. Do this after the next 10 minutes and then after the following 10 minutes as well.

Allow the candle to cool for 90 minutes. Break the surface every 15 minutes. Reheat leftover wax to 93ºC/199ºF and top up the mould. Lift the mould out of the water and allow the candle to cool for another hour.

Remove the template from the neck of the mould and pick off any lumps of wax that have leaked out of the top. Cover the outside of the mould with dish washing liquid and then peel the mould back on itself to remove the candle.

Using the craft knife, carefully trim the wax ridge from the base of the candle to create a rounded shape. Shave off small amounts of wax at a time until you achieve the required fruit shape.

Mix some poster paint with a small amount of water and dish washing liquid. Brush it over the candle and allow it to dry. Wipe off any excess paint with a cloth dampened with white spirit.

To finish off your creation, dip the candle in green or yellow wax heated to 82ºC/180ºF for four seconds. Wait for one minute then re-dip for a further two seconds. Leave for 10 minutes, then polish the pear with a damp cloth.

 

 
 

 

DID YOU KNOW?:


All sorts of substances, such as crayons and poster paints, can be used to color candles. Make sure that your substance of choice is wax-soluble, since some substances can clog the wick and cause the candle to go out. Enjoy experimenting with wax by mixing different dyes together at different strengths – you'll be amazed at the beautiful effects you can create!
As for other candle-making equipment – it really is inexpensive, and you'll probably find most of the bare essentials in your kitchen!